Tin is one of the most recognizable metals on the planet thanks to the familiar tin can. In reality, tin is quite rare, making up only two parts per million of the Earth’s crust. Sepro Labs has metallurgical testing services to find out if tin can be economically recovered from your mineral resource.

Tin is one of the most recognizable metals on the planet thanks to the familiar tin can. In reality, tin is quite rare, making up only two parts per million of the Earth’s crust. Sepro Labs has metallurgical testing services to find out if tin can be economically recovered from your mineral resource.

Contrary to popular belief, tin cans are not made of tin. Instead, cans today are made from aluminum and use tin as a protective coating. Tin prevents rust and corrosion, prolonging the life of our cans. The same misconception applies to tin foil which was historically made from a thin slice of tin but is now made with aluminum.

What Is Tin Good For?

What makes tin such a useful metal is its ability to combine with other metals to form alloys. For example, bronze is a mixture of tin and copper which was so revolutionary when it was discovered that it ushered in a new era of civilization appropriately named the Bronze Age. People were able to manufacture quality tools and weapons for sale or trade.

How Are Tin Alloys Used Today?

Common modern alloys which tin is a significant component of include pewter and solder. Pewter is used to make tableware, trays, decorative ornaments and other household items. Solder is used to create a permanent bond between metal pieces, like wires in a circuit board. The solder needs to have a lower melting point than the parts being connected; the low melting point of tin makes it perfect for this application.

Tin is used in many different industries to help with producing finished goods. For example, window glass is made by floating molten glass on molten tin to create a smooth, flat surface. This is called the Pilkington process.

How Do You Extract Tin?

Tin is commonly extracted via a process called gravity concentration. Gravity concentration separates minerals and metals by exploiting their relative density differences.
There are a variety of gravity separation techniques that have been developed over the past millennia. Sepro Labs has access to a wide range of gravity testing options such as centrifugal units, heavy media separation, shaking tables and analytical tables. However, our specialty in advanced centrifugal gravity concentration is a perfect fit to recover tin, even in ultrafine tin slimes.

Compared to other beneficiation technologies, gravity concentration is inexpensive to operate and install, has a low environmental impact, and can recover ultrafine metal particles. For the most advanced and precise metallurgical testing services, contact Sepro Labs today.

-Solve Labs has metallurgical testing services to find out if tin can be economically recovered from your mineral resource.

Contrary to popular belief, tin cans are not made of tin. Instead, cans today are made from aluminum and use tin as a protective coating. Tin prevents rust and corrosion, prolonging the life of our cans. The same misconception applies to tin foil which was historically made from a thin slice of tin but is now made with aluminum.

What Is Tin Good For?

What makes tin such a useful metal is its ability to combine with other metals to form alloys. For example, bronze is a mixture of tin and copper which was so revolutionary when it was discovered that it ushered in a new era of civilization appropriately named the Bronze Age. People were able to manufacture quality tools and weapons for sale or trade.

How Are Tin Alloys Used Today?

Common modern alloys which tin is a significant component of include pewter and solder. Pewter is used to make tableware, trays, decorative ornaments and other household items. Solder is used to create a permanent bond between metal pieces, like wires in a circuit board. The solder needs to have a lower melting point than the parts being connected; the low melting point of tin makes it perfect for this application.

Tin is used in many different industries to help with producing finished goods. For example, window glass is made by floating molten glass on molten tin to create a smooth, flat surface. This is called the Pilkington process.

Gravity concentration allows Sepro Labs to accurately determine full-scale recoveries of metals like tin. Compared to other beneficiation technologies, it’s inexpensive to operate and install, has a low environmental impact, and can recover ultrafine metal particles. For the most advanced and precise metallurgical testing services, contact Sepro Labs today.